Goat Care Summary

PJ Jonas
Alpine Dairy Goat Care
At Goat Milk Stuff, we take our herd management very seriously. Not only are the goats the foundation to our business, but in many ways, they are also a part of our family. We pay strict attention to the condition of each individual goat to make sure they get what they need to be happy and healthy and give us high quality milk.

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Dairy Goats and Hay

PJ Jonas
Nigerian Dwarf Dairy Goats in Southern Indiana
Hay is absolutely essential for dairy goats. They need the roughage to keep their rumens functioning properly. Some people choose to not feed hay during the summer months while their goats are on summer pasture, but at Goat Milk Stuff, our goats get free-choice hay year-round because I want the dry material in their rumens in addition to the wet pasture they are eating.

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Alpine Goat Birth Stories

PJ Jonas
Alpine Dairy Goat Birth Stories
In 2017, we Facebook Live'd most of the goat births. The video quality is sometimes (but not always) blurry, but you'll have a great chance to see what kidding at Goat Milk Stuff is actually like! That means you'll see the family joking around and getting nervous and working incredibly well as a team. And none of it is edited, so don't watch if you're squeamish. Make sure you're following us on the Goat Milk Stuff Facebook page so you're updated when we're live.

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Coccidia Prevention

PJ Jonas
Coccidia Prevention in Dairy Goats

Coccidia is a parasite that infects the intestinal tract of animals. While a goat may have some coccidia in its fecal sample, if the count becomes too high and the burden becomes too great, we say the goat has "Coccidiosis". Diarrhea is the primary symptom of coccidiosis and there are many ways to prevent or treat coccidiosis.

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Why Bottle Feed Baby Goats

PJ Jonas
Bottle Feeding Baby Goats
All of the Alpine dairy goats at Goat Milk Stuff are bottle raised. This takes a lot more work for our family, but we do it because we believe it is best for the kids, the dams, and the family. Discover the reasons why we go to the extra effort 

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CAE in Goats

PJ Jonas
A Beautiful Herd of CAE-Free Alpine Dairy Goats

CAE stands for Caprine Arthritis Encephalitis. It is a virus that affects goats and not humans. Goats pass CAE to each other via infected colostrum, milk, or blood. It is not passed from feces, breeding, or sharing food and water.  If you raise goats, it's important to make sure that your herd is CAE free.

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Aquila Acres

PJ Jonas
Nigerian Dwarf Goats
We got our first goats in 2005. Since we were planning to breed them and register their kids with the American Dairy Goat Association (ADGA), we needed to come up with a herd name. We hadn't launched Goat Milk Stuff at that point (it wasn't even a glimmer in our eye), so we didn't choose Goat Milk Stuff as our herd name.

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Alpine Goat Colors

PJ Jonas
Alpine Goat Colors
Alpine goats come in many different color patterns with fancy French names (since the original Alpines are French Alpines). The color pattern is based on what the goat looks like when they are shaved because as their hair grows out, some of the black can fade to brown and some of the white can darken. 

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A Goat's Digestion

PJ Jonas
Alpine Dairy Goats in Southern Indiana

The sun radiates massive amounts of energy to the earth continuously. We humans can only harness a little bit of that, and we do so inefficiently. Goats on the other hand supply nearly all of their energy needs by efficiently converting solar energy stored in grasses and other plant material. How can they do this?

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Which is Better - Dairy Goats or Dairy Cows?

PJ Jonas
Which is Better: Dairy Goats or Cows?
People ask me all the time why I chose to raise dairy goats instead of dairy cows. There are two main reasons - the milk itself and the animals themselves. After owning and milking a Jersey cow, it quickly became obvious that our family much preferred goats for many of the following reasons.

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